Omas Milord Burgundy

The middle child of Omas’s normal product line: 

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I promise I didn’t just reuse last week’s photo.

The Milord is a certain small-medium size of pen, similar to the Pelikan M400, Sailor 1911, or Pilot Custom Heritage 92. This is my favoured size of pen: I like how light it is when uncapped and unposted, and the Milord doesn’t feel cheap at all, being solid in the hand and very well balanced.

I’ve noticed that the older Omas production runs of the Milord and the Dama differ in size from their most recent counterparts. Mine does indeed say EXTRA on the barrel, and while I don’t have a modern Milord, my burgundy Dama is indeed the larger of the two I own. 

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OMAS EXTRA etched on the barrel.

The cap screws on tightly and the Greek key band is the only obvious ornamentation on the pen. The whole thing looks sleek and streamlined, regardless, and exudes a feeling of good taste. Underneath that, a beautifully-designed single-tone 18k nib awaits.

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Close up of the nib (note the 750 in the diamond).

It writes just a touch on the dry side, but has no issues producing some wonderful shading and an extremely even fine line. It’s also a real fine: none of that Pelikan over-broadness, and not quite as tight a width as the Japanese fines. I do also enjoy the slight feedback, just a little more than most Italian pens I’ve tried (that hadn’t had any nib work done), which lends writing with it a very tactile feeling. 

The piston, as with all my other Omas pens, works without a hitch, drawing ink with no problems. You’ll get 1.2ml of ink in a full fill, which is plenty, given how thrifty the nib is!

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Easy writing, with good shading.

This pen will definitely earn its place as a stable daily driver. It’s not flashy, and looks good in a coat pocket or indeed any other setting, and, if filled with a businesslike colour, won’t attract too much attention. In particular I like the burgundy shade, which I think gives it a touch of richness that black pens don’t have.

More writing below, with a slightly over-exposed shot:

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